Sunscreen confusion

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ZillaSunAn article in the New York Times describes consumer confusion over the ever-rising SPF numbers (used to rate the efficacy of sunscreen lotions), and their interpretation.

Unfortunately, the NYT adds to the confusion with the following:

The difference in UVB protection between an SPF 100 and SPF 50 is marginal. Far from offering double the blockage, SPF 100 blocks 99 percent of UVB rays, while SPF 50 blocks 98 percent. (SPF 30, that old-timer, holds its own, deflecting 96.7 percent).

Technically they’re right:  doubling the blockage is not the same as halving your radiation exposure.  But in terms of safety, the issue isn’t how much UV exposure you’ve avoided, but rather how much UV actually gets to your skin cells (which would then be a 2% versus 1% comparison).

According to the article, SPF measures how much longer a person wearing sunscreen can be exposed to sunlight before getting a burn, when compared to someone wearing no sunscreen.  Someone wearing SPF 50 can remain in the sun 50 times longer than someone with no sunscreen, and so SPF 100 sunscreen provides the wearer with twice the protection (in terms of time) as SPF 50 sunscreen.

It turns out there is a sense in which SPF100 is not twice as effective as SPF50 in protecting your skin, but it has nothing to do with the 99%/98% comparison.

According to the NY Times, “a multiyear randomized study of about 1,600 residents of Queensland, Australia” found that most users applied at most half of the recommended amount of sunscreen.

“If people are putting on about half, they are receiving half the protection,” said Yohini Appa, the senior director of scientific affairs at Johnson & Johnson, of which Neutrogena is a subsidiary.

But in fact they are receiving far less than half the protection:   a 2007  British Journal of Dermatology study noted that cutting the amount of sunscreen in half did not reduce the effective SPF in half, but rather reduced it geometrically to its square root.

If a person uses half of the recommended amount of an SPF50 sunscreen, they’ll get the protection of an SPF7 (since 7.1 is roughly √50), while similarly underapplying SPF100 sunscreen gets the protection of SPF10.

Apparently, if you’re looking for the protection of an SPF30 product, but like most people tend to under-apply sunscreen, you should be shopping for sunscreen rated as SPF 900.   No word yet on when such products will hit the marketplace.

(One wonders: does this work the other way ’round?  If I apply TWICE the recommended amount of a cheaper SPF8 sunscreen, do I end up with the protection of SPF64 sunscreen?)

3 Responses to “Sunscreen confusion”

  1. patientia Says:

    Unfortunately, that doesn’t work in practice. The layer of sunscreen that thick couldn’t stay on the skin for long. Even if we apply a moisturiser with SPF first, and foundation with SPF after 10 minutes, we could mess our protective layer from moisturiser.

    And SPF only measures UVB protection. There are many standards for UVA protection, but still not required in many countries. EU standard requires UVA protection to be at least 1/3 of UVB protection.

  2. Michael Lugo Says:

    Looked into this this morning; the abstract of the study that you’re referring to says that if you double the amount of sunscreen, you almost square the protection. (Not quite — the effect is dampened by the fact that SPF is an average over wavelengths.)

  3. Michael White Says:

    In Australia, we can only get up to SPF30 sunscreen. Not sure why that is…

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